“Feel The Ad Love” Podcast – The Seven Stages of Brand Advocacy – How To Define Your Brand, Tell Your Story, and Build Raving Fans with Savage Brand’s Jackie Dryden

advertising podcast

Jackie Dryden, the Chief Purpose Architect for Savage Brands, is a member of the Southwest Advertising Hall of Fame. We sat down with Jackie to talk about advertising, and her formula for the seven stages of brand advocacy. Take a listen and learn how you can get some of that good stuff for your brand.

This interview with Jackie Dryden is a lesson in getting your brand out there, so its understood, believed and your brand advocates are telling everyone.  It’s really not that hard if you follow her seven steps.  There won’t be a test at the end, but there just might be a benefit for you.  Jackie is also co-author of the book “Get Your Head Out of Your Bottom Line, and Build Your Brand on Purpose”.  That’s her word “purpose”, and you will find out why that word drives her agency and her clients success stories.  So, with “purpose” get ready to be great.

PODCAST TRANSCRIPTION:

Bruce Abbott:
Hey. This is Bruce Abbott.

Ray Schilens:
My name is Ray Schilens.

Bruce Abbott:
Welcome to Feel The Ad Love!, a podcast produced by Radio Lounge, featuring the inside scoop on advertising and marketing with guest interviews with some of the brightest minds in advertising.

Ray Schilens:
Really interesting, as we progress through 2019, so many folks are looking into doing podcast. They are discovering the value of a podcast as an alternate opportunity to market their company, their services, and we’ve got so many calls this year.

Bruce Abbott:
Podcasting is hot right now, and you’re listening to this podcast. We love to do this just for the fun of it, but we do a lot of podcasts for clients and organizations, and if you’re interested in doing a podcast, maybe you’ve got an idea or maybe you’ve got a company that’s thinking, “Man, that would be a great addition to our marketing mix,” visit radioloungeusa.com. Give us a buzz. Contact us via email. We’ll help you get started on that.

Ray Schilens:
Come over for lunch. You can see our new podcast studio. Studio B is now Studio P for podcast.

Bruce Abbott:
I like that.

Ray Schilens:
We have the ability to not only bring folks into the studio to do a live podcast with folks right there in the studio, but, obviously, through Zencastr, we’ve got the ability to record a podcast with guests from almost anywhere in the world, and then you’ll launch it and let the world know about your brand, so Radio Lounge USA is the place to to come visit and find out more about our capabilities there.

Bruce Abbott:
We are exploring current trends and topics, the latest news and events in our ad community with a very special guest today. We are talking with Jackie Dryden.

Ray Schilens:
Jackie is the chief purpose architect of Savage Brands, when you live on purpose, you become unstoppable, and with a passion for helping others discover why and what for. Jackie’s been doing this for many years, and she had an opportunity to join us from Nashville, where she now lives, and it’s a great interview. I hope you’re going to enjoy it.

Ray Schilens:
I just love it when a person defines themselves with something other than president and CEO or something like that. Here at Radio Lounge, I am the… What am I? Identity crisis department. I forgot. No, I’m in the identity crisis department at Radio Lounge.

Bruce Abbott:
Yeah, there you go.

Ray Schilens:
Jackie Dryden is the chief purpose architect at Savage Brands, and when you live on purpose, you become unstoppable.

Bruce Abbott:
With a passion for helping others discover why and what for, Jackie Dryden leads individuals and organizations to uncover and align with their purpose, but don’t be fooled. Her purpose probing strategy packs quite a punch that shakes people to their foundation, and as a speaker, writer and purpose coach, Jackie spends her days provoking others to uncover the true reason they exist beyond earning a living and loving family.

Ray Schilens:
Loving where you live, too, so, Jackie “Purpose” Dryden, her business book, Get Your Head Out of Your Bottom Line, And Build Your Brand on Purpose, there’s that word again, guides visionary leaders to reconnect with their true strengths through the power of purpose.

Bruce Abbott:
A proud veteran of the advertising industry, Jackie has spent the bulk of her career at advertising agencies as a creative director, and her work has been recognized with hundreds of awards for creativity and was recently inducted into the Southwest American Advertising Federation’s Hall of Fame.

Ray Schilens:
I didn’t know that. I guess I should know that. Right, Jackie? I think that’s an important thing to know, so congratulations on that. That must have been a great opportunity, so welcome to the podcast. We finally get around to letting you say something, Jackie. Hi.

Jackie Dryden:
Oh, my gosh, I was just listening and going, “Who is that you’re talking about?” I’m not sure.

Ray Schilens:
She’s like, “No, keep it going. Keep it going. I like this. I like this.”

Jackie Dryden:
It sounds great to me.

Ray Schilens:
Bring it on.

Jackie Dryden:
I love it that you’ve keyed in on chief purpose architect because I made it up. I was like, “Let’s see, nobody else has this title. How do I want to talk about what I do?” and putting chief in front of anything sounds important, so, rather than just being a purpose architect, I wanted to be a chief one, and nobody stopped me, so I have that, and I’m trying to own it. I’m trying to earn it I guess is the best way to say that.

Ray Schilens:
Good news is we know it’s a higher pay grade, so there you go.

Bruce Abbott:
It is. It is.

Ray Schilens:
It comes with a Gulfstream G6, too, so I would… I’m glad that you’re there.

Bruce Abbott:
It is just-

Jackie Dryden:
Man, I can’t wait to try that out.

Bruce Abbott:
Because I’ll tell you what, it is what the assistant purpose architect is longing to be at some point, so you are…

Jackie Dryden:
My whole life’s ambition.

Bruce Abbott:
… the ultimate goal right there.

Ray Schilens:
Hey, assistant, give me some coffee. The Seven Stages to Brand Advocacy from Savage Brands, just the name Savage Brands, it’s like, yeah, we mean business. You’d better listen and do what we say. No, you don’t attack it like that. You attack it with purpose.

Jackie Dryden:
It’s great because we get to say, “Come play with all the savages.”

Bruce Abbott:
That’s right.

Jackie Dryden:
We call ourselves savages, and we get to own that moniker, which gives a little edge to it.

Ray Schilens:
Yeah. I like that. With loincloth aside, let’s talk about the first stage of brand advocacy.

Bruce Abbott:
I’m going to set this up just a little bit because this is very cool, because one of the things that you’ve mentioned before is that, yes, all companies communicate, but acknowledging the stages of the communications journey and where information turns into belief and into action, you mentioned that really determines the success. Fill me in a little bit about where you’re going with that.

Jackie Dryden:
Yeah. I think, after years of working with companies to not only align their culture, but look at what they were saying outside of their organizations, we saw this large gap that people kept saying, “I already told everybody that. We’ve said that. We’ve said a hundred times,” and we started dissecting this and looking at the great companies and how they were building this brand loyalty, this tribal loyalty where people will hold on to it like, “You can’t take my iPhone out of my hand. I will clutch it until the day I go. You could give me seven Androids for free, and maybe they work better, but I’m loyal to this brand,” and why is that?

Jackie Dryden:
We started looking at how companies put information out there, set it, boom, thank you, check it off the list and move on, and we realized that there were other things in the background happening or not happening, which made those communications fall flat or made them work, and it wasn’t just putting the message out there, and so we dissected it down into seven stages.

Bruce Abbott:
Then, as we jump into those seven stages, your first stage, awareness, what is that?

Jackie Dryden:
If you are just sitting there in the corner thinking something, it’s not going to be known, so awareness is putting the message out there, actually committing to saying, “This is what we want to say. This is the intention behind it. This is what we mean,” and building awareness, and many brands do this well, and they’ve got a lot of chatter going out there, so it’s this first stage of going, “Okay, that fit into my frame of awareness. I heard some noise. I heard something going on.” That’s step one, and most brands leave it there.

Ray Schilens:
One of the things that I find with a lot of folks, when you ask them to define their business or define their place in the marketplace, they go, “We’re family owned and operated.” It’s like, no, you have a purpose in your business and in whatever you do.

Bruce Abbott:
I always think of the mafia, family owned and operated. I don’t know. It’s-

Ray Schilens:
Yeah, and they are.

Bruce Abbott:
Aren’t they family owned and operated?

Ray Schilens:
Yes, they are…

Bruce Abbott:
Maybe.

Ray Schilens:
… and we respect that much here at the program.

Bruce Abbott:
That whole thing with the sequence of awareness you mentioned, beginning with sharing a message, I mean, without awareness, you are invisible. It’s the most familiar step, and too many companies really… I mean, they stop there, don’t they?

Jackie Dryden:
They do. They say… I mean they have… “We all have checklist of things to do,” and it’s like, “Okay, we need to communicate this. We have a new product. We have a new service. We’ve moved locations. Something has happened. Boom. We did it. We sent the email out. We took out an ad. We did something, and we communicated. We have built awareness,” and they check it off their checklist. There’s a lot happening to the people receiving those messages that are not included in stopping there.

Bruce Abbott:
Just because they put that information out there, it doesn’t necessarily mean that it connected with the intended audience.

Ray Schilens:
I don’t think folks really understand the art of connection, at least in many cases, and, obviously, through Savage Brands and through your seven stages, you helped them get to that. What is it about connection, Jackie?

Jackie Dryden:
Yeah. I mean, connection is this piece where you need to be sure if that message was clear, so you might’ve said it in a way that only 3% of your audience understood it, so how do you check for clarity? How do you actually find some way of getting some communication back or building dialogues or asking questions or engaging your audiences in a way where you can find out if they actually understood what you said? It could have been awareness, but it was just noise out there, just chitter-chatter that, yes, that was heard, but did I actually understand it?

Ray Schilens:
Depending upon who-

Jackie Dryden:
Do I know what they’re saying? Yeah.

Ray Schilens:
Depending upon who you’re talking to, there has to be a connectivity there, and there are many, many different languages as you say, so it really depends on your brand, your product, how you speak to those folks that you want to get the message out. Is that right?

Jackie Dryden:
Exactly. If we go back to the Apple example and you look at the way that their messages are created, so they’re out there and the messages are there, but they know that there is a connection because they understand their tribe so well that, if you’ve watched some of their commercials, they don’t even say anything. A lot of them are just visuals, and they are emotional connection, and what they have learned is that their connection point with their audience is through something a little more visceral and not just by listing, “Here’s what we have. Here’s how much it costs, and here’s where to get it.”

Bruce Abbott:
At this stage, they have a decision they can make. They can connect. They can… or comply and they’re… or just merely tune it out. Right?

Jackie Dryden:
Think of how often we do that. How many messages? I mean, there are some number, I certainly can’t quote it to you, about…

Bruce Abbott:
4 bazillion every day…

Jackie Dryden:
… how many messages we’re-

Bruce Abbott:
… or something.

Jackie Dryden:
Yeah, every day, and you just filter so many of them out and go, “Not for me. Not for me. Don’t care. Whatever. For another time,” and the majority of messages are filtered out. Was it understood, and did I actually know what you said? I mean, if you said, “I’ve got four new things, four new services coming out, and here’s what they are,” and I don’t even know what those are. I mean, you described them to me. I have no understanding. I don’t have a connection point. Then this connection actually follows right behind it where I start to say, “Does that mean anything to me? Do I care? Do I comply with this? Do I understand it, or do I just tune it out?” so, yeah, we kind of did it, but we smooshed those three in there. First, I need to be aware of it. Second, did I understand what you said or what I read or what I heard or what I saw, and then there’s this beginning filter that I say, “Do I connect with that? Does it mean anything to me? Do I care?”

Ray Schilens:
Because of the connection standpoint, if you’ve got a particular brand or a particular service or product, you don’t have to connect with every one. You’ve got to connect with the core target of your brand, so that becomes a little bit simpler rather than to have an understanding of a variety of connection points here. You know where you need to go. You know how to connect.

Ray Schilens:
That makes a lot of sense, Jackie. What about belief? How do you train belief? How do you send the message of belief or honesty in your product or service?

Jackie Dryden:
Yeah, belief actually comes from the person listening to it, so, if I said, “I’ve got this brand new line of shoes, and they’re all $1,” I might have the awareness. I might’ve heard that. I might’ve understood what you said. They’re all a dollar. I might have connected in a way that I went, “Hey, I use shoes. I want something inexpensive,” but then the belief thing comes in and I go, “Yeah, I don’t know. I don’t believe that. That doesn’t sound right to me. That doesn’t feel right to me. That is not my message because I don’t think I’m going to be wearing a $1 pair of shoes for long,” so this belief thing is do I trust what the message is? Do I actually go, “Yep, that could be real. That sounds right to me,” and so your belief becomes this foundation for what I choose to do from here forward, because if I-

Ray Schilens:
Is belief something you can put a message out or do you earn belief from your product?

Jackie Dryden:
I think there’s both sides to that. I do think you can put a message out that is believable in terms of the tone of what you’ve said, that I have some past history with the company, or that you have put it in the trappings of giving me the confidence that, yes, this is probably true, but there is an earned piece to that, which is where we get into the more loyal after I’ve actually tried something.

Jackie Dryden:
An example of this is I have this new Aussiedoodle puppy, who’s nine months old, who has all this hair and hasn’t been groomed yet. I’m in Nashville and I’m looking for mobile groomers. I want somebody to come to my house. I looked on websites, and so I had awareness. I understood what they said they did. I had a connection to, yes, I need this. I need to know more. My belief came in when I started making this subjective decision of which one do I actually believe is going to be right for me, not that what they’ve said is not true. Belief doesn’t mean only is it real or not, but is it for me?

Ray Schilens:
I have a quick question. Is belief driven by all of these ratings that you find? Is that a pathway to believing, or how do you actually discover the deep and true meaning of belief?

Jackie Dryden:
I do think that there is the… there’s the Amazon effect, and there’s the effect of everybody’s looking to what other people are saying, and that can… I mean if I’d go into something and there’s 17,000 people that are giving it a five-star rating, then that ups my belief level, if it has a one-star rating, or if it’s got a five-star rating by two people. We’re starting to create different mechanisms for belief than we had before, and, you’re absolutely right, that is one new way for people to start to filter. Do I believe this?

Bruce Abbott:
Now that they are investing their time, their effort, their resources into the idea, now they are engaging and they’re saying, “Okay, I’m going to give this a shot. See how it goes. Try this out,” the belief that… what was shared, and they believe it might be… have benefit to them. Tell us a little bit more about the engagement component.

Jackie Dryden:
Yeah. The engagement is another place where companies get and they say, “Okay, now I’ve got you. I’ve made the sale. I’ve brought you in. I’ve created a client or a customer,” so that somebody says, “Wow. I want to try this. I want to get engaged with this product or service, because what you have done at this point is you’ve made me believe there’s a benefit to me. You may have put out there what the benefits are in general, but there’s maybe one or two of them that I went, ‘That’s what I’m looking for. That’s the piece that I needed to know in order to give this a try,’ and so the engagement piece is where the rubber meets the road because, up until now, it’s chitter-chatter, and I’m processing things, and you’re putting messages out there, but now I’ve said, “All right, let’s give it a try.”

Ray Schilens:
You do, and, hopefully, it turned out good. As we roll back to the belief and engagement segments of your Seven Stages to Brand Advocacy, I want to ask you about your dog trim. Did you do it, and, now, do you believe? Are you engaged?

Jackie Dryden:
Here’s what’s so cool is I only called them today, and the guy on the phone was amazing. I mean, he was just like so personable and so great and made me feel like I had the only dog on the planet. He also did a really cute thing. He’s got, “Oh, it’s your lucky day. Our very best groomer happens to have a cancellation next week,” and I was like, “Oh.” In my brain, I’m going, “I’m sure this is the standard story,” but my belief level was I wanted the best groomer, and I wanted to go, yeah, I want… so I’m set up for next week. I’ll give you a rundown after I experience it, but now I’m engaged.

Ray Schilens:
Film at 11 and an update for next week on the dog trimming story. This could be-

Jackie Dryden:
See? Oh, I loved it.

Ray Schilens:
This could be this guy’s lucky day. I’m just thinking here.

Jackie Dryden:
That’s right.

Ray Schilens:
You’re engaged, and I sure hope it turns out right because dog hair grows very slowly.

Jackie Dryden:
I know. I don’t want her to be so ugly that she’s embarrassed. Right?

Ray Schilens:
Became a Labradoodle or one of those dogs with no hair. Loyalty. Man, oh, man, oh man, I think there are so many businesses out there, service businesses, any kind of businesses that are out for the short term. They’re going to take all the money they can from you. I’ve known some auto repair places that do that, and they get in, they get out, and then they move to Canada or Mexico, but loyalty is such an important part. That’s true. Loyalty is such an important part of any business.

Ray Schilens:
Our business here, we’ve had clients for like 25 years or so just because they are loyal, because we do them [crosstalk 00:18:53].

Bruce Abbott:
Feeling the love.

Ray Schilens:
Feeling the ad love and feeling the love, but loyalty is important. Let’s talk about loyalty for just a moment. That, by the way, for those keeping track with your pencil, that is point number six.

Jackie Dryden:
There you go. Point number six, so loyalty is earned. This is where you have earned it, that what you said, somebody understood. They connected with it. They believed that this might work for them. They tried it, and then they went, “Whoo-hoo, this is great. This is my thing. These are my people. This is my product. This is my company.” You have proved out all that happened in front of this, and this person becomes loyal to that brand, and you can lose loyalty, but I think what you said earlier about the people that do all the front part and then they just get your money and move on, yeah, cable companies and cell phone companies could figure this out.

Jackie Dryden:
One of them could rule the world because they operate on churn, which is, “Let me give you the bright, shiny deal for a year, and then I’m going to stick it to you after I’ve got you.” If they flipped that equation and said, “I’ll give you a good deal, but after you’re a customer for a year, I’m going to give you a better deal. I’m going to take care of you,” and if they emailed every one of their customers and said, “Because you’ve been loyal for a year, we’re dropping the price $10.” Now, you would get loyalty. If any one of those companies did that, I would say I’m yours forever. You actually saw me as something other than an entry point to get in, to take my money and…

Bruce Abbott:
Mm-hmm (affirmative), bait-and-switch.

Jackie Dryden:
… then drop me like a hot potato and only give the deals to new customers.

Ray Schilens:
Yeah, not a lot of companies get that though. Do they, Jackie?

Jackie Dryden:
Kind of sad, and those that do dominate. I would love to have been a fly on the wall the day that somebody said, “Here’s the deal I’ve got. We’re going to charge five bucks for a cup of coffee, but we’re going to give you the Internet and make it feel warm and fuzzy.” Do you want to do that? No.

Ray Schilens:
Don’t forget about the sensory stuff there, too.

Jackie Dryden:
Yes. Yes. They created an environment in which people realized it wasn’t about the coffee, it was about the experience, and that’s this loyalty piece. When you get me into the experience mode that I have good vibes with what our connection is, then I am loyal.

Bruce Abbott:
[crosstalk 00:21:22].

Ray Schilens:
Very good. Very good point, so we’re on to advocacy.

Bruce Abbott:
Advocacy. Now, this-

Jackie Dryden:
Number seven.

Bruce Abbott:
To me, this is where you are… You’re taking this to a whole new level at this point now. I mean, you are no longer in love, but you want to share the love, so-

Jackie Dryden:
Yeah, I want to keep it to myself anymore because this is so good, and I will start telling your company’s story, and we do it all the time. You have a favorite restaurant or you have a favorite product, and you start telling a friend. You’re going, “Oh, my gosh, this is amazing. You have to try this.” Now, that kind of endorsement beats the five stars always from [inaudible 00:22:01].

Bruce Abbott:
Mm-hmm (affirmative), raving fans.

Jackie Dryden:
When we start telling it to each other, and you get it from a trusted source that somebody says, “Oh, my gosh, Ray, have you tried this? This is amazing.” You go “All right,” so this loyal… This advocacy piece that comes behind the loyalty is, “Now I am your mouthpiece. I’m telling your stories for you, and you can’t shake me because I’m sticking with you.”

Ray Schilens:
There’s not a lot of companies that have all of these seven in order or have grasped the importance of having these attributes to their business. That is your job with Savage Brands to do that. How do people receive your message? Do they get it, or is this something you got to hit them over the head or train them or what, Jackie?

Jackie Dryden:
Yeah. There’s a spectrum here. Some people are ready to do this and get it, but there’s an investment here, and not… I’m not talking about financial investment. There is that, but there’s an investment in your company when you say, “I care enough to understand how I build this loyalty,” and this is not only outside of my company, but how do I do this with my employees? How do I share a message with them where they understand it and they connect with it, they believe in what I’m saying, that they engage with it and go, “Yeah, this will probably work for me,” build loyalty, and I become an advocate for my own brand? It works on both sides. Yes, it is hard for people to get it in a checklist world of, “I was told I would do this and it would work.” Check. There’s a long-term commitment to building brand advocacy. You can’t do it in five or 10 minutes or five or 10 months each time.

Ray Schilens:
Yeah, I’ve got a bunch of product to move this weekend. Can you run some radio ads and some print maybe and-

Bruce Abbott:
Just to trick them into getting on the lot and we can-

Ray Schilens:
Yeah, and we’ll sell those things.

Bruce Abbott:
Yeah, we’ll-

Ray Schilens:
Hey, Jackie, I want ask you about this statement here. There’s a reason people go to work every day that has nothing to do with money. There’s a reason they’ve chosen the career and the industry they’re in. The reason is usually a strong desire to make a difference. Did you write that? Is that yours?

Jackie Dryden:
Yes.

Ray Schilens:
What does it mean? What does it mean when you say that statement?

Jackie Dryden:
It means that what they have shown by research is that the reason that somebody stays in a job is not money. It is not for a raise or a promotion or a title. The reason that people stay in jobs is because they believe they are doing something of value with people they respect for a company they admire.

Jackie Dryden:
When you can build a group of people, build a culture around people who care about the same thing, what is the difference you want to make in the world, what is the good you want to do, how do you want to move the needle as a group of human beings, that company becomes unstoppable, because it’s a group of people who are interested in being additive, not what can I take away. It’s a different mindset from the way most of us have been raised, and we are out there with B-suite trying to retrain the brain every day to saying it’s not about shareholder value, that happy employees make happy customers, happy customers make happy shareholders, in that order. PS, thank you, Herb Kelleher, Southwest airlines. He said that.

Ray Schilens:
Mm-hmm (affirmative). That’s a great statement as well. You wrote a book. You wrote a book called Get Your Head Out of Your Bottom Line. What a great title that is.

Bruce Abbott:
And Build Your Brand on Purpose.

Ray Schilens:
That was Bethany Andell. Bethany is part of the agency, as I recall, right?

Jackie Dryden:
She’s president, and she is the daughter of Paula Savage, who, yes, there is a Savage. Paula Savage started Savage Brands 45 or six years ago, and now it has gone on to the second generation. Bethany Andell is her daughter, and she is president of the company, so we-

Ray Schilens:
How was it like to write a book? Was it fun?

Jackie Dryden:
Oh, no.

Bruce Abbott:
We’ve asked that before, and not a single person I know has said that it was a fun process. It looks like writing a book is like giving birth. It’s wonderful, and you’re glad when it’s over, but the whole process-

Ray Schilens:
Champagne along the way and you had a good time, and a lot of people like it, too, as a matter of fact, don’t they?

Jackie Dryden:
I guess so. I mean, we felt that obligation in writing this book, that there were a lot of people about eight or 10 years ago when we started on this quest of purpose that we’re starting to talk about it, but it was more about the message only. We wanted to help companies understand how not only to uncover what that is, but how to align a culture around it and how to deliver their company out to the world in a way that gave them a solid foundation for creating something monumental that had sticking power, that had endurance, that was about longevity and not like you were talking about earlier, “Let’s get this stuff sold this weekend and get it out the door,” so the new conversation, and anything that is new there is resistance.

Jackie Dryden:
We come up across it every day, but, oh, my gosh, it’s so gratifying when people get it, and you see the light come on and you see them start to shift inside their company, which makes that messages start to shift, which changes the relationships with clients and customers. It’s amazing when it happens, but it is challenging, and so the book was really our homage to saying, “We have figured out a way to do this, not the way.” We don’t say, “Hey, we’ve got the tiger by the tail. We’ve figured it all out. This is the only way to do it.” This is one way that we have seen it to be effective and work.

Ray Schilens:
Jackie, it is so much fun to look at your agency. Savagebrands.com is the website, and, of course, you can review the Seven Stages to Brand Advocacy at the website, but I got to tell you, you’re having fun doing this, and that’s important. Your word is purpose, and I think we all need purpose in life, a reason to wake up in the morning to do something great, and you guys are rocking it in that regard, so congratulations on that.

Jackie Dryden:
Thank you.

Ray Schilens:
You’re living in Nashville now, and I think that’s really cool, too, because that’s one of the best cities in America, too, so you’ve made some good choices here along the way, so it sounds like you’re still having fun and there is a lot more to do.

Jackie Dryden:
Absolutely. I think if you’re not having fun, then you shouldn’t show up. You need to have your heart and soul and both feet in it, and when you do, the people around you feel it, and it radiates out, so thank you very much for sharing the time with me to put this message out. I hope somebody hears it and says, “Wow, I can do this in a way that has greater impact on my employees and my customers and clients.”

Bruce Abbott:
All seven. Jackie Dryden, chief purpose architect for Savage Brands, with a passion for helping others discovering the why and what for. Thank you so much for joining us today, Jackie. It was awesome.

Ray Schilens:
Do great things, Jackie.

Bruce Abbott:
Indeed.

Ray Schilens:
Thanks.

Jackie Dryden:
Thank you for having me. I loved it and appreciate your time.

Ray Schilens:
It’s Ray and Bruce here saying thank you for feeling the ad love.

Bruce Abbott:
Hey, be sure to visit our website, radioloungeusa.com. Also, subscribe to the podcast in iTunes, Spotify, Google Play or via RSS, if you haven’t already. That way, you never miss a show.

Ray Schilens:
While you’re at it, if you found value in this show, we’d appreciate a rating on iTunes, or if you’d simply tell a friend about the show and share it on social media, that would be really, really cool.

Bruce Abbott:
Copyright 2019, Radio Lounge, all rights reserved.

Ray Schilens:
Join us next time for another episode of Feel The Ad Love!