“Feel The Ad Love” Podcast Episode 8: Joe Biondi talks Houston Public Media and How Broadcasting Is In His Blood.

advertising podcast

To be great in our industry, you need to explore all aspects of it, from on-air, to sales, production, and you need to spend some time in the corner office, running the show. Joe Biondi has done this and a whole lot more. Joe spends his energy crafting sponsorship opportunities for Houston Public Media. When it comes to advertising, NPR and Houston Public Media takes a different approach. You’ll enjoy hearing Joe’s story.

Do you have to love what you do to be really great at it?  We think so.  When you hear Joe’s story you’ll catch what we’re saying.  With a family bloodline that dates back to the golden days of Top 40 Radio, Joe was born to do this kind of stuff.  And he’s done it all, from on-air to sales, marketing and management.  Joe has a passion for radio,and as an account executive for the NPR affiliate station in Houston, Joe is the perfect fit to grow their advertiser base.  Houston Public Media has embraced some exciting new venues to get their message out to an adoring fan base.  Joe takes us behind the scenes with some history and the vision HPM has for the future.

PODCAST TRANSCRIPT:

Ray Schilens:
I’m Ray Schilens.

Bruce Abbott:
This is Bruce Abbott.

Ray Schilens:
Welcome to Feel The Ad Love.

Bruce Abbott:
A podcast produced by Radio Lounge at radioloungeusa.com, featuring the inside scoop on advertising and marketing and podcasting and all kinds of cool stuff. And we have guest interviews with some of the brightest minds in those industries and each episode we explore current trends and topics and the latest news and events in our community.

Ray Schilens:
Lots of folks wonder who Radio Lounge is, and well, we’re going to tell you right now. We’re audio production services. We do that for broadcast, for film, on to patient audio experiences and of course digital media. We also do voice coaching and the production of high end voice talent demos.

Bruce Abbott:
And we also do podcasts, as you’re listening to this one here. We do a lot of podcast production. We do a lot of podcast training. In fact, we have a podcasting podcast for podcasters that we will be launching here in the next few weeks. Really a podcast for marketing professionals and businesses that want to use podcasting not as a hobby, but as an extension of their marketing capabilities. And we’re going to be talking about, oh gosh, everything from the podcast prep and production and performance to marketing, monetization and more. How’s that for alliteration? That was… you know . And so we’re going to be having that coming up, launched in the next few weeks. So we’ll fill you in more on the details as that gets a little closer.

Ray Schilens:
So many words beginning with the letter M. I’m really impressed by that. Somebody else who you’d be impressed with is Joe Biondi, an account executive of underwriting and sponsorship for Houston Public Media. If you’re not familiar with Houston Public Media, if you’re not familiar with NPR, I’m sure you are. But you would not believe what agent Houston Public Media is doing here in the Houston market, not only on the broadcast side, but on the streaming side, on the public service side, lots and lots of stuff going on there. You’re going to like this interview we did with Joel Biondi. Let’s take a listen.

Ray Schilens:
Joe Biondi is an account executive, an underwriting and sponsorship type person at NPR here in Houston, which is Houston Public Media. And a Joe is also a brand new member of the American ad Federation Houston, and he’s on the board now. You’ve got an important position, a very important position, Joe.

Bruce Abbott:
That they pay you the big bucks for it.

Joe Biondi:
I’m still waiting on that part, but…

Ray Schilens:
And don’t expect a check today because it’s not coming anyway.

Joe Biondi:
No, no, no.

Ray Schilens:
The thing that fascinates me, my background is radio and I love radio and, so does Joe’s as a matter of fact.

Joe Biondi:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Ray Schilens:
Joe’s father’s cousin was a guy by the name of Dick Biondi. Now…

Bruce Abbott:
The Biondi name in Houston?

Ray Schilens:
Biondi name? Well, Biondi name in the country because Dick Biondi used to be, what was it, Joe? On the big KB he was on, he was on CFL.

Bruce Abbott:
Was he?

Ray Schilens:
He was everywhere.

Joe Biondi:
Yeah. And he actually-

Bruce Abbott:
CFL Chicago?

Joe Biondi:
Yeah, CFL, WLS, the big KB out of Buffalo. He started, coincidentally enough, in Alexandria, Louisiana. That was his first full time air position and went from there back East and then ended up on KBW in Buffalo and then signed on, what became WLS the rock and roll flame thrower, I think it’s at 890 am in may of 1960 when they switched it over from the prairie farm station. At the time it was owned by a Sears, which is why they got the call letters WLS, which stood for World’s Largest Store. And he was the first rock and roll disc jockey. He’s in the rock and roll hall of fame, the radio broadcasters hall of fame. And he just recently came off the air at at 80 plus years old. I talked to him not too long ago. He’s doing well, but as you can imagine, he’s getting on in years, but he’s had… I mean, what a what a life, right?

Ray Schilens:
Oh, yeah. What a life. Is that something that got you interested in getting into media and radio and such, or what?

Joe Biondi:
Yeah. When I was a young guy, my dad told me that his cousin was a disc jockey, and when I was growing up here in Houston, I was listening to Barry Kay, The Bogeyman and Captain Jack on 610 KILT, [inaudible 00:04:14] James, Stevens and Pruitt, Hudson and Harrigan. I was just fascinated with radio. And then at night I used to go to sleep listening to the CBS Radio Mystery Theater on my little am radio, transistor radio. All right. And then I grew up, my dad was a big fan of Stan Freberg and all of those old audio comedy guys. So that always filled my head and I was not good at sports because I had a really horrible problem with one of my eyes, which prevented me from having depth perception, which that comes in handy if you like shooting baskets or hitting baseballs.

Bruce Abbott:
Wait a minute, it’s over here! No, it’s not.

Joe Biondi:
Yeah. I wish somebody would have figured that out before I quit. But, so I was just fascinated with radio and when I went to Texas Tech in 1980, I walked right into the station up there and said, I want to be a disc jockey. And they kind of look sideways at me. And a few months later after reading news and whatnot, I got to start to do as a music jock, and then rode that for 12 years until I came off the air at the end of 1992.

Ray Schilens:
Wow. Big background there. Go for it, Bruce.

Bruce Abbott:
I love it. You were mentioning the Houston radio things. It’s kind of funny for me because guys like Hudson and Harrigan, Captain Jack, Rick [inaudible 00:00:05:34], I got a chance to work with those folks several years. So here in the Houston market, Houston Public Media, so how exactly is Houston Public Media a good fit for this market, I mean, especially now at this time?

Joe Biondi:
That’s a a really good question. In my mind, I came from the commercial side radio and then I had at one point switched over to cable TV in the advertising sales and management. But I’ve always had an near bent towards the programming and the product side of things. And I’ve always, if I can say I’ve been one thing relative to the on-air guys that I worked with after I came off the air, which is I was very respectful of what they did and how they did it and I understood their lives in and all the energy and creativity that goes into doing that well. And so I worked in radio when Rush Limbaugh was blowing up in the early nineties, and I saw sort of a polarization of the media start to take place.

Joe Biondi:
So my heart’s always been in the programming side of things. And when I was interviewing for this position here at Houston Public Media, I’ve always been a fan of NPR for a number of reasons, but mostly because of the long form stories and the more or less anti-bias, middle of the road reporting that you can get. I think it’s as close as you can get anywhere. And then I was a huge fan of PBS TV 8 when I was growing up, because that’s where I saw Benny Hill and Monte Python and Nova and science and all these other things. So when I was interviewing here, to answer the question, was that I told my boss that, you may not like what you hear on public media, but here’s the thing, nobody’s screaming at you. Because that’s what really has kind of frosted me on what I see on TV and what I hear, and in some cases on radio, is just this unending talking over one another and the loudest guy in the room makes the point.

Joe Biondi:
And I just, I don’t hear that on public media. And I think that allows us to have a venue where you, again, you may or may not agree with the opinions expressed, but you have the chance to hear them and you can agree or disagree, but nobody’s yelling at you at the same time.

Bruce Abbott:
I mean, media has really changed in the last five years. I mean, when you think about what you were just saying, yeah. That, I mean, it’s okay to just come on there and scream at each other and nobody takes turns. But speaking of changes, how has Houston Public Media changed over, say let’s say, the last five years?

Joe Biondi:
Well, I’ve been in the chair here two years and prior to that was still living in Albuquerque. So what I understand of the history, from what I’ve been able to glean, is that as it moved into a more news focused product. The radio station that I remembered when I was going to U of H and when I left Houston in 1980 was music at some times, news at another time. It was kind of what might be considered a middle of the road format or full service format. That there was classical music during the day and there was news in the morning and the afternoon, and maybe a local program here or there.

Joe Biondi:
But as public radio has evolved and you see more stations around the country going through a full news product, that’s where I think Houston Public Media, News 88.7 and NPR found itself going and then decided to do that as well as it can be done. Houston’s a big market, the number four or five market for radio in the country. So this station plays a role and has, I think, a very vital role in the dissemination of information. And as we saw with hurricane Harvey, which happened prior to me starting here, the station played a critical role in getting information out.

Joe Biondi:
So it’s very much a part of the fiber of the Houston media and I think it’s evolved as public radio as evolved around the country into more of a purely news product that serves a very important purpose.

Ray Schilens:
I think you’re absolutely dead on a rise for that. It is indeed a part of Houston and it shows it every day. And I love also going back to what you said earlier as well, it is not a sophisticated or stuffy approach, but it’s an intelligent approach to talking to older listeners, which I really appreciate it because I believe that some other types of talk shows do dumb it down basically to speak to a mass. But you stay the course there and that’s an important thing. I want to ask you something, Joe.

Joe Biondi:
Yeah, mm-hmm (affirmative).

Ray Schilens:
The Beyond the Billion campaign, it’s in the news. It’s a big thing right now. Does Houston Public Media see any direct benefits as a result of that? And if not, well, why not?

Joe Biondi:
That’s a really good question and I’m not as familiar with the campaign as I should be. I know that there’s a thought out there that the government supplies the majority of our funding, right? And that gives people a platform to beat up on public media that it’s taxpayer funded and it doesn’t express my opinion, yada, yada, yada. But the reality is, is that it’s less than 10% of any operating budget for any public media outlet, and specifically for here at Houston Public Media. So we are very, very reliant on subscribers and sponsors and underwriters. And so that is a huge campaign. I don’t know how that all splits out. And I wish I could give you a more lucid answer but I don’t want to say something that is factually incorrect. I don’t want to duck it either, but I want to be honest with you.

Ray Schilens:
You did a good job of trying to answer there.

Bruce Abbott:
Just spin it like the politicians.

Joe Biondi:
You know-

Bruce Abbott:
It’s funny because I was going to ask you this, because obviously Houston Public Media depends a lot on the national efforts of NPR. Do you guys have local media in the mix? I mean, how important is that local media to your efforts, especially when it comes to underwriting?

Joe Biondi:
Well, there’s a newsroom one floor above us where there is 17 local reporters and a news director and a digital team. And so we have reporters that work beats like old reporters or the reporters of days gone by do. And they are very dedicated to doing journalism the way journalism should be done. So what that affords us here in the underwriting and sponsorship side of things is that when we go to our clients and we say, would you like to underwrite and sponsor Houston Public Media, and then we can give you mentions on our air, there’s a great mix of the product that’s nationally originated, like All Things Considered and Morning Edition, BBC for instance.

Joe Biondi:
And then we have local hosts that are helping to weave all of that together with the local newscasts that we get in the mornings in the afternoons. And so it gives us a platform to have that local content, to have that local feel to not only what goes out on 88.7, but also in the case of TV 8 when we do locally produced vignettes, for instance, for like the upcoming Ken Burns country music documentary that’s coming up. We’ve produced small interstitials and vignettes, which feature local artists doing country cover songs. So we have that local presence, which I think is critical for us to then bring to our clients and say, by sponsoring and underwriting Houston Public Media, not only are you supporting this product here, but you’re getting this audience that supports people that support Houston Public Media.

Joe Biondi:
So it’s very symbiotic and a very powerful relationship I think that local programming and that local focus brings to the efforts that we do here in underwriting and sponsorship.

Bruce Abbott:
And plus you guys, I mean, you’ve got a very creative staff there. What kinds of new ways are you able to engage underwriters, kind of beyond that traditional method?

Joe Biondi:
Well, that’s good timing on that question. I spent several hours yesterday preparing to do a download for one of the local agencies here in town, the advertising agencies. There’s always a perception about, wherever you are, there’s a perception that is some person’s reality. And when I came to Houston Public Media and started digging into what I call the toolbox of what we have to work with, it occurred to me very fast that my perception was was incorrect.

Joe Biondi:
There are so many tools and platforms that we have to use. For instance, we have locally produced podcasts with Houston Matter’s, Unwrap Your Candies, Party Politics, Encore Houston for instance, that we can use for local underwriters. They can sponsor those. Then we also have the local newscast. We have Marketplace which comes in nationally. And so we have national platforms, we have local platforms, we have our digital platforms. Within the digital platforms of houstonpublicmedia.org, there’s a whole slew of places that our underwriters and sponsors can put either website advertising, well, not advertising. It’s not advertising per se, but they can put a messages up there which help drive people back to their websites. And then on TV 8, with the local production of the interstitials and the local sponsorship of country music by Ken Burns, we can dovetail into that programming.

Joe Biondi:
So the platform in and of itself is much broader and much deeper than I think that the perception is out there in the advertising community. And so that’s part of my job is to help educate people on what we do bring to the table. And that’s a lot.

Ray Schilens:
I’ve always felt that a Houston Public Media, NPR for that matter, has always been kind of the grandfather of the podcast format. In other words, NPR always went out, told a story, went a little bit more in depth, again with a sophisticated but not stuffy attitude, an intelligent attitude. And really, when you look at all the podcasting that’s going on today, it really sounds like it’s an extension of what you guys do on the air. So I was really excited when you talked about that. So you are taking the things that you have on the air and you’re going well beyond that. And does that all relate to sponsorship opportunities for a Houston Public Media?

Joe Biondi:
It does. One thing I forgot to mention is that we also have the ability to geotarget national podcasts, which are generated from PRX, which is the public radio podcast producing wing in New York City. So our local sponsors can be in front of some of those nationally oriented or nationally generated podcasts as well. So that does provide me opportunities to go to my clients and prospects and say, okay, what is it that you’re looking to accomplish with your underwriting and sponsorship, and how then can we take the pieces of this puzzle and put it together so that not only are you going to reap the benefit of supporting public media, but the listeners and the viewers of Houston Public Media do support the supporters. So in that kind of reciprocal way, I bring a value back to the sponsors and the underwriters to ideally help them with their goals, whatever their goals may be.

Joe Biondi:
So I say a lot of my job is to go in and be a doctor, if you will, and ask a lot of questions and and see what solutions or which problems I can help address. I found in my years in commercial media that at some points some of the people that I’d worked with would just say, here’s a package, take it out and sell it. And what I found with doing things like that, in some cases, not all cases, it was to solve a problem the radio station or the TV network had not necessarily a problem that the client had. And I have found if I have any success or any expertise at all, it’s going in to discern what it is that a sponsorship, or an underwriter in this case, would need to solve and how can we use our tools then to help affect that in a positive way.

Bruce Abbott:
There’s something about NPR, and even the programming that you guys have that just seems to really connect more with listeners, maybe more than than other types of programming. Why do you think that is? Is it that a lot of it is the story telling component that we love to listen to stories? Is that maybe what makes it so special and such a good outlet for the listeners?

Joe Biondi:
Yeah, I agree with that. I think that part of the appeal, again, is that it’s a conversation. Podcasting, I think one of the reasons podcasting has really exploded is because it’s bringing back the art of conversation. A friend of mine runs the iHeart Media stations in Salt Lake City and he and I were talking about, that the art of conversation is coming back because we’re in a kind of information truncated society where you just get bits and pieces here and there on your smartphone or wherever. And the way that NPR puts the product forward with long form advertising, not just 20 second news bits, but let’s take two, three, four minutes, five minutes, whatever it is, dig into this story, do some research, interview people, edit it, put it together. I think it’s a much more respectful presentation of information, primarily.

Joe Biondi:
And then because it is respectful of the listeners intelligence in their engagement, that there’s that bond that happens with people like myself who have been fans of public media forever and ever, because I could listen and I could form my own opinion and I could take the information and agree or disagree with it, but it wasn’t being shoved down my throat. It was being presented to me and in a respectful manner that I actually have my own brain and thoughts and things like that. So I think that’s a large part of why there’s a huge engagement.

Joe Biondi:
I did a research piece last year for something we were doing here, coming at it from my old programming brain when I was on the air in radio. And I looked at how many people prefer News 88.7 as a percentage of our audience, and then how many people listen to us exclusively. And the most recent numbers I ran just yesterday were like 83, 84% of our audience prefers us first. 27% listens to nothing other than Houston Public Media, News 88.7, which as a programmer is nirvana. You want that sort of engagement, you want that sort of loyalty. And in doing that, you get stark raving fans and that just makes everything work better. So I think… Sorry, I’m kind of rambling on here, but I think that is part of the appeal and the reason for the engagement and the loyalty that you hear.

Bruce Abbott:
So now I have to ask, what’s some of your favorite programming on there?

Joe Biondi:
Oh, it’s going to sound silly, but Wait, Wait, Don’t Tell Me.

Bruce Abbott:
Oh, of course. I mean, my family had this little tradition, our Saturday morning with our Car Guys, Click and Clack, and then into Wait, Wait, Don’t Tell Me.

Ray Schilens:
I know the guy died, okay? But can’t you bring him back? I mean, come on, come on.

Bruce Abbott:
Well, yeah, everybody loves Wait, Wait, Don’t Tell Me. I mean, it’s just… But, yeah. So what are some of your favorite programs? Maybe some of the national programs, maybe some of the local programs.

Joe Biondi:
Well, locally, I love listening to Houston Matters. I think Craig Cohen does a phenomenal job, and David Pitman is our morning show host. He weaves that tapestry together between NPR and Morning Edition and our local stuff like an artist paints. So where I really became a fan of NPR was with afternoons, Morning Edition, All Things Considered. Years and years ago I became a fan of All Things Considered, and that’s what sucked me right into it. And then, as I moved back to Houston and got involved with Houston Public Media and started listening to Wait, Wait, Don’t Tell Me in the mornings when I go out for what I consider a jog, most people would consider a fast walk. I have my headphones on and I’m listening to Morning Edition.

Joe Biondi:
I love listening to Marketplace because you get some really kind of a solid economic news that doesn’t have a political agenda behind it. So those would be the places where I hang my hat right now. I love listening to Think and the Texas Standard, which are statewide programs that we’re a part of with the Texas Public Media Network. You get to hear what’s going on in other parts of the state. Houston is so big, it’s hard to keep up with everything going on in Houston, but Texas, it’s like a whole other country. I don’t know if you’ve ever thought of that. But there’s so much going on around the state and those particular Texas Public Media statewide newscasts were really awesome as well.

Bruce Abbott:
Yes. But when will KUHT bring back the classics, the Monty Python, the Benny Hill. When will those come back?

Ray Schilens:
All right Joe, how much money is it going to take, baby? Come one. [inaudible 00:24:30], okay? We’ll get this started.

Joe Biondi:
I just, I recently, even though I think I’ve had access to this for a while, as a contributor to Houston Public Media and TV 8, I have access to what’s called Passport. And Passport is an archive of Public Media or NPR programming. I haven’t looked to see if a Monty Python’s there, but you gave me a job for tonight. I’ll go back and call the app up and take a look and see if it’s there.

Ray Schilens:
Please let us know that. Okay?

Bruce Abbott:
Growing up in Houston as a kid, that was like the closest thing to sneaking in and watching a rated R movie was to be able to match Benny Hill and Monty Python after mom and dad went to bed.

Joe Biondi:
Well, I watched it with my dad. I mean we were…

Ray Schilens:
So he was part of a progressive family then?

Joe Biondi:
Oh, yeah, yeah.

Ray Schilens:
So your dad’s cousin probably-

Bruce Abbott:
Don’t tell mom.

Ray Schilens:
So you’re a perfect fit for this job, aren’t you Joe? I mean, this was made for you, it feels like. Doesn’t it?

Joe Biondi:
They’ve given me a place to land because I came to Houston without a job. When we moved back here, my wife and I moved back just a little over two years ago. A lot of family things were happening. It was just time to get home. But that was the only thing where I was like, I’ve never done that without a place to land. So Houston Public Media gave me that opportunity. And then secondarily, and just as important I think, is joining the Advertising Federation gave me the opportunity to network with people in the industry. So in a pretty short time span, I’ve been able to get to know a lot of people in the market, and that’s helped me out greatly with what we do here and helped me understand Houston and the media market more than I have. So I’m grateful to not only Houston Public Media but the Advertising Federation for being so welcoming.

Ray Schilens:
And down to my next question here, you are now a very active member on the American Advertising Federation board. You hold a title, you are a secretary.

Joe Biondi:
Yeah.

Ray Schilens:
Talk about your experience so far, Joe, and why you came to participate as a board member.

Joe Biondi:
I again, knowing that I needed to network when I got back to town, I went to several Houston Business Journal events and I looked up the Houston Ad Fed and I said, well, I’ve got to go. I’ve just got to start meeting people. I knew a lot of people that knew a lot of people in the radio world and TV world when I came to town, but that was still two or three degrees of separation. And I wanted to shake somebody’s hand and get to know them personally. So I went to my first Ad Fed lunch, and probably about two years ago, and stood there like a like a fish out of water. I was just like, I don’t know who to talk to. I don’t know what to say.

Joe Biondi:
And a woman from KTRK, and I’m forgetting her name, was kind enough to come up and introduce herself. And that started the ball rolling, and I got to meet her and I started collecting business cards and writing thank you notes. And then I started volunteering for anything that they needed help with. And that led to volunteering for two of the American Advertising Federation awards, and just getting involved there. And then somebody said, well, would you like to come on the board? And I said, absolutely. How can I help? And so that was the entree onto the board.

Ray Schilens:
Well, we love having you there.

Joe Biondi:
Thank you.

Ray Schilens:
And coming off of, we just had an event today. We’re recording this and we had an event today that was so cool.

Joe Biondi:
Yeah.

Ray Schilens:
And it worked so well. And I get the vibe, and you tell me if I’m wrong, but I get the vibe that this new year John Manlove is our CEO and chairman and such, this is going to be one heck of a great year. Don’t you feel that, Joe?

Joe Biondi:
I do feel that. And as a semi musician, I was in a band for 30 years as well in Albuquerque and I’ve had the great fortune of playing in front of huge crowds and small crowds and just music has always been a passion of mine. Why does that relate to what your question was? Well, I’ve always known that sensing the energy of an organization is primary to understanding whether or not it’s going to make some difference. And so I’ve always tried to tune in to the energy of my clients, for instance, and the organizations that I’m with, to see where that energy is calibrated. Because when the energy is high, when there’s that, just that kind of drive to make it better, things do improve. And I really, really feel that now this year with the Ad Fed, that there’s a lot of commitment with the people on the board that want to bring the programming like we had today, which was just crazy good.

Joe Biondi:
And then involve more people in the advertising community and figure out what the next iteration of it is. How does the Houston Ad Fed then get on the map nationally as the guys to watch. And that may sound like a big hairy audacious goal, but like Casey Kasem used to say, “Shoot for the moon, and even if you miss your among the stars,” right? So let’s think big and let’s think creative and let’s go for it.

Bruce Abbott:
So were you a student at U of H?

Joe Biondi:
For a little while, yeah. Yeah. I ended up going to Texas Tech. I graduated from a strict Jesuit 1979, went to U of H for a little while. Wasn’t quite a fit for me so I went to work. I’m going to name some things that people may remember.

Joe Biondi:
Cutter Bill’s Western world on Westheimer. I worked there for eight or nine months and then I went and worked off shore for Western Geophysical. And then went to Texas Tech, came back, went back for another year. I worked my second summer offshore as well. It was a great job for a young guy that was trying to figure out his path in life. And then from there got involved in the radio business in Lubbock, Texas. From there went to Austin, was there for a couple of years and then Beaumont for a little bit and then went back to Albuquerque, and I came off the air after four years in Albuquerque. So yeah, that was kind of my educational path. Houston or University of Houston, then Texas Tech. And then I took some classes at University of New Mexico too. So I’m on the 20 year plan.

Bruce Abbott:
It’s kind of funny. It has all come full circle.

Ray Schilens:
Yeah, you’re back home, baby.

Bruce Abbott:
Back home.

Ray Schilens:
Hey, one last question, dude. When you were in the band, did you have hair, Joe?

Joe Biondi:
Well, that’s how long I was in the band. When I started in the band, yes.

Bruce Abbott:
I started with hair.

Joe Biondi:
Yeah, and now when we play I wear caps.

Ray Schilens:
There you go. I had a feeling that was your answer.

Ray Schilens:
Joe Biondi, account executive underwriting sponsorship, KUHF, Houston Public Media. Joe, it’s been a pleasure having you here today. I really am excited about the things that Houston Public Media has done and is still going to do. It is indeed one of my favorites. And again, I’ve said it before, but you are just a perfect fit for this organization. And one of these days we’re going to get you out here at the lounge so we can hear your chops on whatever guitar you want to play it on, okay?

Joe Biondi:
I can’t wait. Thank you so much. I really appreciate you having me on.

Ray Schilens:
Ray and Bruce saying thank you so much for listening to Feel the Ad Love.

Bruce Abbott:
And check out our website, radioloungeusa.com. Subscribe to the podcast, iTunes, Spotify, Google podcasts or whatever platform you like to use. And that way you never miss a show.

Ray Schilens:
And while you’re at it, if you found value in this show, we would appreciate a rating on iTunes. If you’d simply tell a friend about the show and share it on social media, that would be really cool. Thank you.

Bruce Abbott:
Hey, Thanksgiving’s coming up. I think you should share it at the Thanksgiving table. Why not? Come on, the family’s all there. Copyright 2019 Radio Lounge. All rights reserved.

Ray Schilens:
Join us next time for another episode of Feel the Ad Love.